Living in our faith: moleskine theology

My moleskine notebook is a great metaphor for our lives. Its pages exist together in complete bounded harmony, though the pages inside might be varied.  It has grocery lists next to biblical exposition, driving directions next to songs in progress.  This juxtaposition is a helpful and healthy look at spiritual maturity.

Songs

Songs

When we become more mature in the faith, the faith should become more a part of us- so much so, where if one were to remove the faith from me, I would, in a sense, not be Greg Willson, but something else.  The Word should penetrate our lives to such a deep level that it is a fundamental part of who we are, and us of it.
List

List


Drawing Around

Drawing Around


When this happens, I believe we will not see such a stark divide between all things “spiritual” and “not spiritual” but, in may areas, we will see more things as “spiritual.” Christianity isn’t just praying and reading, but “living-in.”

Living-in is a comfortable, real and almost tangible authenticity.  There is a depth of maturity that exists where we assume (in all its positive connotations) its genuine truth.  This is not a leap of faith, in fact it’s the very opposite.  It seems to come from living and experiencing God’s grace day in and day out over a long period of time.  Understanding that we make mistakes and God is still a loving Father.  Understanding that we can have comfort in the tumult of life.

Living-in means that we don’t switch to Christian-mode when speaking on some subjects and some other mode when speaking on others.  When we make out grocery lists or try and write a worship song, we are living in our identity as believers united to Christ. We seek to be a part of the consistent worldview of all parts of life that God’s voice has to offer.

Notes and Lists

Notes and Lists

Now this illustration could also be seen as syncretism, embracing secular non-Christian ideas alongside Christian ideas, but doesn’t have to be that way.  Sure, we could see the moleskine metaphor as one that gives an OK to contradictions, and all that depends on what makes it on to the page.  All of this requires being self-aware, allowing the Spirit to lead us to truth.  But we don’t have to be contradictions- we can live side by side, comfortable in our own faith, and also not assuming our faith (in all its negative connotations).

Message Prep

Message Prep

The assumption I’m referring to is not us becoming more worldly, but the Word becoming more of us. I’m not advocating us to think less, but think more.  We all assume we are part of an earthly family, we don’t doubt its existence and effects on us, all the more, if we are believers, we should assume we are part of the Trinitarian Family and embrace its existence and effects on us.

I’m not in any way saying that I’m at a place like this, but am seeking God to bring me there.  It’s a funny thing, this thing called of sanctification. Just when I feel like I have hold of it, it slips away.  I guess that’s why Jesus said, “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”

10 thoughts on “Living in our faith: moleskine theology

  1. I agree with the idea that lists, notes, conversations, and all those extra tidbits are part of Christian life. The opposite view smacks too dangerously of ignoring others around us. On the premise that God created me, I can take the time to rejoice and praise God for all the little oddities that make me who I am. The scar on my face, the french horn in my living room, and the art on my wall are not insignificant items in my life, although I do not find them mentioned in the scriptures.

    I will not withdraw these things from God, instead, I will live in such a way that my hobbies and interests can be presented to God as pleasing activities. I’m not going to meet and love non Christians if I hide in a church.

  2. @Chuck: You bring up some great points. All the little things that make up our life may not be explicitly mentioned in Scripture, but are affirmed by how God created us as unique beings.
    It’s interesting (and sad) that the church is a place to hide from all of our diversity, or even from non-Christians. Our churches shouldn’t be a haven for the ingrown, but a sending agency for those who Christ has made confident in who we are, scars and all.
    Chuck, I would love to see your notebook (be that metaphor or real).

  3. @Justin: Oh yes, our tradition’s great suspicion of ours and other’s traditions! Well, just don’t advertise it around Southern Baptist circles…they may make you walk the aisle :) .

  4. @Greg: Bold is better than blink, I think.

    I kept the notebooks as real journals. They are lots more than a journal with daily entries. They include lists, addresses, directions, carpentry calculations, bible verses and musings, and every other little thing. The main problem I have transferring them is my lack of grammar and spelling. Full sentences? Not when you’re only working with a 3×5 page!

  5. @Chuck: The creator of the blink tag even agrees with you, from Wikipedia: “The inventor of the blink tag, Lou Montulli, has said repeatedly in interviews that he considers the blink tag to be ‘The worst thing I’ve ever done for the Internet.’”

  6. Pingback: greg willson » Blog Archive » Living in our faith: bluegrass of Bill Monroe

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